A fine Great War Battle of the Hundred Days probable attack on Havrincourt Wood 11th September 1918 Military Medal group awarded to Sergeant J.C. Orger, 13th Service Battalion, Rifle Brigade, who saw service out on the Western Front from 20th May ...

£695.00
Availability: IN STOCK
SKU: A1511
Condition: (4) Good very fine
Description:

A fine Great War Battle of the Hundred Days probable attack on Havrincourt Wood 11th September 1918 Military Medal group awarded to Sergeant J.C. Orger, 13th Service Battalion, Rifle Brigade, who saw service out on the Western Front from 20th May 1915, and was decorated for his bravery in the London Gazette for 11th February 1919. His battalion was in action at Havrincourt Wood between 11th to 14th September 1918, and suffered 2 officers and 26 other ranks killed, along with 2 officers and 98 other ranks wounded.

Military Medal, Geo V, named to B/1191 SJT J.C. ORGER. 13/RIF:BRIG; 1914-15 Star named to B-1191 CPL J.C. ORGER. RIF: BRIG: British War Medal and Victory Medal both named to B-1191 SJT. J.C. ORGER. RIF.BRIG.

Joseph C. Orger was born in Clerkenwell, London, and by 1911 was working as a messenger for a surgeon’s practice, whilst living with his family at 54 Moreland Street, City Road, London. With the outbreak of the Great War he enlisted into the British Army and saw service as a Corporal later Sergeant with the 13th Service Battalion, Rifle Brigade, serving out on the Western Front from 20th May 1915. Orger was serving as a Sergeant when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 11th February 1919, which indicates an award won during September 1918, with his award being noted in the Battalion War Diary for the end of October 1918, one of 24 awards of the Military Medal to the battalion for this period, and it is most probable that his award was for the attack on Havrincourt Wood on 11th September 1918. The period from 11th to 14th September 1918, witnessed his battalion suffer two officer and 26 other ranks killed, and two officers and 98 other ranks wounded, with a further 12 other ranks missing. Orger was subsequently transferred to the Class Z Army Reserve.