Crimea Medal 1854-1856, no clasp, officially impressed naming, awarded to Carpenter’s Crew James Johnston, Royal Navy, who came from Cruden Bay, Aberdeenshire, and was present aboard the 92 gun second rate ship of the line London during the Crimea...

Lot: 4010
Description:

Crimea Medal 1854-1856, no clasp, officially impressed naming, awarded to Carpenter’s Crew James Johnston, Royal Navy, who came from Cruden Bay, Aberdeenshire, and was present aboard the 92 gun second rate ship of the line London during the Crimean War, but arrived after Sebastopol had fallen and hence did not qualify for the clasp. An officially impressed medal without clasp to the Royal Navy is considered to be rare, and only a relatively small number of sailors and marines, all from the ships London, Niger, Rodney and Wasp, subsequently received an officially impressed Crimea Medal, the majority with the single clasp Sebastopol. Crimea Medal 1854-1856, no clasp, officially impressed naming; (JAS. JOHNSTON. CARPR’S CREW.) James Johnston was born on 13th February 1830 in Cruden Bay, Aberdeenshire, and having been at sea, then joined the Royal Navy as Carpenter’s Crew on 10th March 1853 being posted aboard the 92 gun second rate ship of the line London. Johnston was aboard London during the Crimean War, but arrived after the first bombardment of Sebastopol in October 1854 and did not see service ashore, and hence did not qualify for the clasp. He would have returned home with London in January 1856. An officially impressed medal without clasp to the Royal Navy is considered to be rare. Johnston was subsequently awarded one of a relatively small number of officially impressed Crimea Medals to men of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines. Slightly less than 2000 impressed medals were given to the crews of the London, Niger, Rodney and Wasp, four of the five ships that had left the war zone early. The majority of Crimea Medal’s to the Royal Navy were issued unnamed in an order placed with the Royal Mint from the Admiralty in mid November 1855, in order to be dispatched to the Crimea where there war was still ongoing. Of the five ships that had left early, it was deemed that they would have their medals presented to them on arrival in England, with the fifth ship, namely Albion, having its medals specifically engraved by Hunt and Roskell. Of the 743 medals issued to the crew of London, it is noted in an article published in the OMSA Journal in January 2018, that about 100 are known, hence a survival rate of 13.5%. Paid off London on 26th January 1856, Johnston then joined the 2 gun gunboat Rambler whilst she was being completed on 27th January 1856, and he was involved in the final building work abroad her, she being launched on 21st February 1856, Johnston was then transferred off her on 7th March 1856, and re-rated as Stoker from the next day, having volunteered for seven years continuous service on 1st March 1856. After his volunteering for continuous service, he would appear to have rejoined Rambler, which on 23rd April 1856 was present for the Fleet Review at Spithead as a part of the Blue Squadron. Good very fine