General Service Medal 1918-62, Eliz II, clasp Cyprus named to Captain B.H. Fookes, Royal Army Medical Corps. With box of issued. Appointed Lieutenant in the London Gazette of 11th September 1956 from the National Service List, effective 20th Augus...

Lot: 4
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General Service Medal 1918-62, Eliz II, clasp Cyprus named to Captain B.H. Fookes, Royal Army Medical Corps. With box of issued. Appointed Lieutenant in the London Gazette of 11th September 1956 from the National Service List, effective 20th August 1956, subsequently appointed Captain in the London Gazette of 23rd August 1957 effective 20th August 1957. The a Captain on the Army Emergency Reserve of Officers in the London Gazette of 3rd October 1958 effective 20th August 1957. Went on to receive a Diploma in Psychological Medicine, which was confirmed on 11th February 1961 in the British Medical Journal. Bernard H. Fookes had survived the Blitz, and noted down his experiences in a short piece titled ‘My part in Goering’s Downfall’ which was submitted to the People’s War website by Sutton Coldfield Library on behalf of Dr. Bernard H. Fookes. The following explains his experience: ‘Really I had come to think that ‘The Railway Children’ was not a story to excite an eight year old boy, but when it was time to return my copy of the book to the library I decided to persevere and renew it. It normally took me an hour to walk to the library, change my books and return home, but this book was due on 7th September 1940, the day Hermann Goering decided to switch the attacks of the Luftwaffe from RAF bases to London docks. I spent the next three hours watching aerial battles, ‘dog-fights’ from the entrance to Leytonstone underground station. The most curious thing was that at any time the adults around me saw puffs of smoke, they cheered, though they could not possibly have seen whether the smoke had come from a British or German plane. After three hours, the all-clear went, and I renewed my book. On my return home three hours later than usual, my parents did not say a critical word. Imagine today! A child alone, in London, in wartime, three hours late. All this was by Goering’s big mistake by the 15th September. The Few had fought the Luftwaffe to exhaustion. Had the attacks stayed concentrated on the RAF, it would have been exhausted instead. The invasions of England would have followed and the attack on Russia not been delayed until bad weather prevented the capture of Moscow. All avoided because Goring wanted me to pay a library fine. For the Germans there was no Russian oil and no British navy. The following summer Hitler did invade Russia and as soon as I head the news. I said ‘We’ve won!’. In the long term I was right, but nobody has told this nine year old boy that Stalin had already killed his best generals.’. Nearly extremely fine