General Service Medal 1918-62, Geo VI, 1st type bust, clasp Palestine awarded to Private W. Ince, Essex Regiment who was killed in action at Duda Ridge near Tobruk on 27th November 1941

£365.00
Availability: IN STOCK
SKU: A1607
Condition: Extremely fine
Description:

General Service Medal 1918-62, Geo VI ,1st type bust, one clasp: Palestine; (6010905 PTE. W. INCE. ESSEX.R.), with posthumous forwarding letter, named card box of issue, and forwarding envelope addressed to recipient’s father: ‘Mr W. Ince, Lodge Road, Messing, nr Colchester.’Walter Ince was born in Liverpool, and lived in Bolton, Lancashire, though his father appears to have later lived in Messing near Colchester, Essex, which may explain the regiment he then saw service with, as he enlisted for service as a Private (No.6010905) with the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, and was present in Palestine during the Arab Rebellion. With the outbreak of the Second World War his battalion saw service in the Sudan, and fought against the Italians in Abyssinia, as part of the 10th Indian Infantry Brigade in the 5th Indian Division. After the re-taking of Fort Gallabat on 6th November 1940, the battalion fought on for the rest of the campaign, eventually succeeding in driving the Italian’s off Sudanese soil and restoring Haile Selassie to the throne of Ethiopia. In April 1941 the battalion took part in the suppression of Rashid Ali’s uprising in the short lived Anglo-Iraq War, and then took part in the campaign in Syria against the Vichy-French forces. Posted to North Africa in October 1941, the battalion found itself at Tobruk arriving just in time to take part in the break-out from the town. At the end of November 1941 after almost two weeks of continuous fighting, the men of the battalion took and held El Duda ridge just outside Tobruk, which was captured to facilitate a link-up with the advancing Allied army. However more than 200 casualties were sustained, amongst those being Ince, who was killed in action at El Duda Ridge on 27th November 1941. Ince is buried in Tobruk War Cemetery, Libya. Extremely fine