Russia – Soviet: A Liberation of Kovel Medal of Courage to Private Grigory Trofimovitch Ladnyi a Driver in the Logistics Platoon, 2nd Infantry Battalion, 605th Infantry Regiment, 132nd ‘Bachmachskii’ Order of the Red Banner, Order of Suvorov Divis...

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Russia – Soviet: A Liberation of Kovel Medal of Courage to Private Grigory Trofimovitch Ladnyi a Driver in the Logistics Platoon, 2nd Infantry Battalion, 605th Infantry Regiment, 132nd ‘Bachmachskii’ Order of the Red Banner, Order of Suvorov Division, 1st Belarussian Front, who received a second Medal of Courage for bravery near Warsaw a month after his first.

Medal of Courage, type 2, variation 1, reverse numbered 2735784.

Grigory Trofimovitch Ladnyi was a Ukrainian born in 1905. He joined the Red Army from the Krasnocavodskii (Red Star), Military Command in Kharkov in June 1941. He was assigned as a truck driver and later as a rifleman in the 605th Infantry Regiment, 132nd Rifle Division. The unit saw extensive combat including the Dnieper River operations from 24th August – 24th December 1943. Ladnyi was wounded during this campaign on 20th September 1943.

This award, one of two Medals of Courage Ladnyi received, was given to him for his heroic actions during the battle for the liberation of the City of Kovel, in what was then Poland but is now the Ukraine. Kovel had an interesting history. The city was a shelter for Poles who escaped the Volhvnian Genocide, during which approximately 3,700 ethnic Poles were murdered in the surrounding area during ethnic cleansing atrocities committed by Ukrainian nationalists. The timely supply and delivery of food, ammunition and supplies was essential to the success of the Red Army. Private Ladnyi’s heroic actions in performing this essential service in the fight against the Nazis resulted in him being decorated for bravery twice.

This award his first was awarded by 132nd Rifle Division on 16th July 1944: ‘In the course for the battle of Kovel, Vovel Region, Volyn Provice, he timely supplied for the frontline troops, despite heavy enemy fire.’

The 132nd Rifle Division later participated in the Warsaw-Poznan Operations, and for his actions in that campaign as a rifleman Ladnyi was recommended for an Order of Glory 3rd Class. This was downgraded to another Medal of Courage with the following recommendation: ‘Comrade Ladnyi’s battalion received a mission on 25th August 1944 to chase out the enemy battalion 16km from Warsaw, from an inhabited locality and to consolidate the locality. Using its fire, in spite of the strong resistance rendered by the enemy, the battalion implemented its task of driving the German enemy from the inhabited point, and consolidated on the outskirts of the inhabited point. The Germans firing stronger, but the group of soldiers in the attack, in which was serving Comrade Ladnyi. Comrade Ladnyi suffered a serious wound in the leg.’

The 132nd Rifle Division went on to participate in the Vistula-Oder Operations and in the Battle of Berlin. Private Ladnyi survived the war and received this Medal of Courage on 20th September 1945. Good very fine